POSTER REDESIGN

Below is the image of the original poster / social media design (gasp!):

Screen Shot 2018-11-12 at 07.12.30.png

I focused on the following principles for the redesign:

1. Legibility 

2. Visual Hierarchy 

3. Colour 

4. Typography 

5. Context 

 

LEGIBILITY 

For this poster challenge, I wanted to ensure the information being displayed was instantly readable, as the main issue of the original poster was the difficulty disseminating any type of information because there was just too much going on. I aimed for creating a simple poster that emphasized the most important/captivating information. This is how I broke down the importance of information: 

1. Time/Place/Date (practical logistics of the event)  

2. what is this event? / what will included in the event? 

3. how and who to follow for more info on social media  

4. buzzwords about the event. 

Looking at the event website and what was included in the original poster, I selected what I thought to be the most important and well-worded information on the event and carefully considered how I would design it onto the poster. I aimed to have as little paragraph-style information as possible since it is going to be viewed as a tweet/social media post and the audience wouldn’t be spending a decent amount of time viewing the image itself. The information needed to be discernable within seconds of seeing the image. 

VISUAL HIERARCHY 

In terms of the design, layout, and format, I purposefully oriented the poster to be similar sizing as the original as it is the most effective sizing for social media posts and compatible with all platforms. Going A1 or A3 sizing would result in cutting off the information when it would be posted, meaning the viewers would have to click into the image to see the whole thing, which is an extra step that many won't do and therefor the information is being seen by less people than if it were available right from the get go. I also split the poster into thirds-ish (rule of thirds). Compositionally, rule of thirds orientation tends to be most pleasing on the eye and is a good way of breaking up information and creating a visual hierarchy. 

Climathon poster.jpg
CLIMATHON tweet.jpg